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Navy Life Begins At Boot Camp

Navy Life Begins At Boot Camp

Civilian to SAILOR

Great Lakes, Ill. Bainbridge, Md. San Diego, Calif.

This booklet shows only one part of Navy training, the basic indoctrination you receive in Boot Camp. Throughout your naval career you will receive other valuable training which will help you to become a skilled specialist and Navy-man. Sea duty, service school, on-the-job training, will all play a vital part in your transition from civilian to sailor. Good Luck . . . and Good Sailing.

ARRIVAL and 'PROCESSING'

—as the Navy calls it—begins as soon as you get to Boot Camp. You fill out forms and more forms. The Navy wants to know about your family . . . your schooling . . . jobs you've held . . . your interests, hobbies. The more the Navy knows about you, the better chance you have to be placed in the right job. You will have lectures . . . inoculations . . . thorough physical examinations . . . and you will take the GCT—an aptitude test to discover the best job field for you.

You will be welcomed by the Commanding Officer and receive individual religious counseling. You will be given a seabag of clothing and other equipment, and instructions on the proper care and wearing of your uniforms. Before you know it, you'll begin to look like a sailor.

BARRACKS LIFE

After processing, you will be quartered in your own barracks, where you will have access to the mess hall and galley, recreation hall, and drill hall. Here your company will learn to live on a shore station in the shipboard manner. You'll learn that the Navy keeps its ships and stations meticulously clean ... and you'll be doing your share of the `housework.' There's a particular way of stowing your clothes, policing barracks and grounds.

You'll learn to stand BARRACKS WATCHES . . . pass BAG INSPECTIONS . . . give clean sweep-downs to decks, ladders, and passageways . . . wash your uniforms. During OFF DUTY hours there will be time for reading, recreation, and talk and more talk.

COMPANY ORGANIZATION

CompanEE For hard
H'arch
knowledge of military drill is basic for
any military man. So if any one thing
characterizes recruit training, it is
marching. You march to and from
classes . . . in numerous drills . . . at
Saturday reviews and inspections .. .
and at graduation. From the drills you
learn military bearing- . . . you gain experience in giving and following commands . . you learn how to move companies from one place to another with ease. To round out military instruction, you are also taught different types of sentry duty aboard ship and ashore.

The commands—too many and too fast at first—in time become second nature. And all the time pride in your own company's performance is growing. Suddenly the most important thing in the world is for your company to win the weekly pennants and the coveted brigade drill flag.

The company is your group, your unit . . . the outfit in which you take special pride. You share common trials and experiences with other members of the company and thus you become shipmates in every sense of the word. Your company commander has all the answers and you can look to him for leadership and guidance.

He appoints platoon and squad leaders from the ranks. One man is selected as Acting Chief Petty Officer, known as the ACPO. And as a team, the Commanding Officer, the ACPO, and the platoon and squad leaders bring you through regimental reviews, parades, and company drill competitions.

Competition between companies is not confined to drills alone, but includes inspections, athletics, and other activities. Toward the end of training, one of you will be chosen COMPANY HONOR MAN and presented to the Reviewing Officer at graduation.

SEAMANSHIP

A good sailor is a good seaman. Whatever specialty a Navyman may acquire, he must retain the basic skill required of all who go to sea. Classes are held at boat basin where you 'man the oars' learn boat drill first hand. And, course, there are lectures and refer-assignments to such Navy publications as THE BLUEJACKETS MANUAL. You learn such nautical terms as helmsman, fantail, bow painter, dog watch, fathom, and semaphore.

The course on Seamanship covers knot tying, ship recognition, marlinspike seamanship, visual signaling, steering, anchoring and mooring, lookout duties, and watch standing. Seamanship is a briefing on all things nautical.

GUNNERY

The fleet's offensive power is in its ordnance. Naval Aviation also can be .V.` thought of as naval ordnance (or an extension of it), for the firepower of Navy planes can be brought to bear on targets at a considerable distance from the fleet itself.

Gunnery consists mainly of instruction in four standard weapons: the 5-inch .38-caliber gun, the 40-MM gun, the .30-caliber rifle (M1), and the .45-caliber automatic pistol. You carry out the duties of a gun crew on a 40-MM twin-mount.

Drills are conducted on indoor and outdoor ranges and in various firing positions. You are taught radiological damage control, ordnance safety precautions, chemical warfare, and you are shown the proper way to disinfect your gas mask.

You will learn effective ways of fire fighting. Among the equipment and topics studied are chemical principles behind fire fighting, the use of chemical and mechanical foam, fix fog installations, and how to use a hand billy pump.

You'll be shown how to put out a gasoline blaze with CO, and extinguish oil fires in an open tank. You learn the proper way to fight fires in the hangar sections below decks and how to fight hangar fires from topside.

The valuable techniques learned at the Fire Fighter's School reduce to a minimum fear of the element itself. You'll learn that adequate safety precautions and readiness to combat fire minimize the probability of outbreak.

PHYSICAL TRAINING

Physical conditioning is a very important part of recruit training. You begin with calisthenics, and as you develop strength and endurance, you progress to the obstacle courses. You are given instructions in boxing, wrestling, and other sports. You compete in rope climbing, relay racing, volleyball, and tug-o-war.

But most important to you as a sailor is swimming and sea survival. In this part of your training you learn several major swimming styles, as well as the use of life jackets. You hear lectures on swimming submerged, swimming in oily waters, life saving and artificial respiration . . . all a part of the training devised to enable you to take care of yourself.

A separate phase of the Physical Training Program deals with health and hygiene. And, of course, there are facilities for sports such as basketball and softball. By the end of your training you will find that you have gained weight—and all muscle.

TIME OFF

Life at Boot Camp is not all drilling and marching 'on the double.' After your first few 'shakedown' weeks, there is time for liberty over the weekends .. . time for doing the town or having visitors.

You get good Navy chow, and there are `gedunk' stands (soda fountains, to you) where you can get soft drinks, sandwiches, and candy. There are libraries and lounges where you can relax quietly. Religious services are available to persons of every faith.

Mail is delivered every day. You get the finest medical and dental care. You'll share the great spirit of teamwork that exists, as you and your shipmates try to make your company stand out as the greatest. You can manage a grin even when you help with the garbage detail or wash windows. And, of course, the Big Day is PAY DAY. There is nothing dull about Boot Camp. It is an exciting challenge to be met with a sense of adventure.

GRADUATION & LOOK FORWARD

The day every recruit looks forward to . . . the day when your company parades smartly in review to the martial music of a military band.

The first step in your Navy training is now behind you. You'll probably never forget the marching, the hurried atmosphere, the fact that everything was done 'on the double.' But you'll never forget how much you learned either. You learned to live with men of widely varied backgrounds. You found out that discipline is primarily a matter of self-control and character development. You experienced the benefits of the finest physical training.

You absorbed the fundamentals of seamanship, gunnery, and fire fighting. You learned what it means to be a Navyman. And now, at long last, you're on your way to enjoy your first leave and a visit with friends and family before reporting to your first duty station. You're ready for specialized training. You're on your way.

You can look forward to at least 4 years in which to discover career fields open to you. With over 60 ratings, there is a job field for every type person . . . whether you like to work with machinery or men . . . like outdoor life or office work. You will have opportunities to qualify for special schooling, and after 4 years you should be well on your way to the top.

There is also the possibility of qualifying for officer training as you gain experience and know-how . . at the Naval Academy . . . the NROTC colleges . . . as Naval Aviators . . . or through several in-service Navy programs. You can look forward to seeing parts of the world that ordinarily you would only read about in books. In short, you can look forward to a great life . . . the Navy way of life.


DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY
POSTAGE AND FEES PAID
NAVY DEPARTMENT
U.S. NAVY RECRUITING STATION POST OFFICE BUILDING OTTAWA, ILLINOIS
OFFICIAL BUSINESS
NAVPERS 35354
U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE :1957-0-43413e
Civilian to SAILOR
Great Lakes, Ill.
Bainbridge, Md. San Diego, Calif.
This booklet shows only one part of Navy training, the basic indoctrination you receive in Boot Camp. Throughout your naval career you will receive other valuable training which will help you to become a skilled specialist and Navy-man. Sea duty, service school, on-the-job training, will all play a vital part in your transition from civilian to sailor. Good Luck . . . and Good Sailing.
2
ARRIVAL and 'PROCESSING'
—as the Navy calls it—begins as soon as you get to Boot Camp. You fill out forms and more forms. The Navy wants to know about your family . . . your schooling . . . jobs you've held . . . your interests, hobbies. The more the Navy knows about you, the better chance you have to be placed in the right job. You will have lectures . . . inoculations . . . thorough physical examinations . . . and you will take the GCT—an aptitude test to discover the best job field for you. You will be welcomed by the Commanding Officer and receive individual religious counseling. You will be given a seabag of clothing and other equipment, and instructions on the proper care and wearing of your uniforms. Before you know it, you'll begin to look like a sailor.

BARRACKS LIFE

After processing, you will be quartered in your own barracks, where you will have access to the mess hall and galley, recreation hall, and drill hall. Here your company will learn to live on a shore station in the shipboard manner. You'll learn that the Navy keeps its ships and stations meticulously clean ... and you'll be doing your share of the `housework.' There's a particular way of stowing your clothes, policing barracks and grounds. You'll learn to stand BARRACKS WATCHES . . . pass BAG INSPECTIONS . . . give clean sweep-downs to decks, ladders, and passageways . . . wash your uniforms. During OFF DUTY hours there will be time for reading, recreation, and talk and more talk.

COMPANY

The company is your group, your unit . . . the outfit in which you take special pride. You share common trials and experiences with other members of the company and thus you become shipmates in every sense of the word.

Your company commander has all the answers and you can look to him for leadership and guidance. He appoints platoon and squad leaders from the ranks.. One man is selected as Acting Chief Petty Officer, known as the ACPO. And as a team, the Commanding Officer, the ACPO, and the platoon and squad leaders bring you through regimental reviews, parades, and company drill competitions.

Competition between companies is not confined to drills alone, but includes inspections, athletics, and other activities. Toward the end of training, one of you will be chosen COMPANY HONOR MAN and presented to the Reviewing Officer at graduation.

CompanEE For hard
H'arch
knowledge of military drill is basic for any military man. So if any one thing characterizes recruit training, it is marching. You march to and from classes . . . in numerous drills . . . at Saturday reviews and inspections .. . and at graduation. From the drills you earn military bearing ... you gain experience in giving and following commands . . you learn how to move companies from one place to another with ease.

To round out military instruction, you are also taught different types of sentry duty aboard ship and ashore. The commands—too many and too fast at first—in time become second nature. And all the time pride in your own company's performance is growing. Suddenly the most important thing in the world is for your company to win
the weekly pennants and the coveted brigade drill flag.

SEAMANSHIP
A good sailor is a good seaman. Whatever specialty a Navyman may acquire, he must retain the basic skill required of all who go to sea. Classes are held at boat basin where you 'man the oars' and learn boat drill first hand. And, course, there are lectures and refer-
ed assignments to such Navy publications as THE BLUEJACKETS MANUAL
. You learn such nautical terms as
helmsman, fantail, bow painter, dog watch, fathom, and semaphore. The course on Seamanship covers knot tying, ship recognition, marlinspike seamanship, visual signaling, steering, anchoring and mooring, lookout duties, and watch standing. Seamanship is a briefing on all things nautical.
GUNNERY
The fleet's offensive power is in its ordnance. Naval Aviation also can be thought of as naval ordnance (or an extension of it), for the firepower of Navy planes can be brought to bear on targets at a considerable distance from the fleet itself. Gunnery consists mainly of instruction in four standard weapons: the 5-inch .38-caliber gun, the 40-MM gun, the .30-caliber rifle (M1), and the .45-caliber automatic pistol. You carry out the duties of a gun crew on a 40-MM twin-mount. Drills are conducted on indoor and outdoor ranges and in various firing positions. You are taught radiological damage control, ordnance
safety precautions, chemical warfare, and you are shown the proper way to disinfect your gas mask.
You will learn effective ways of fire fighting. Among the equipment and topics studied are chemical principles behind fire fighting, the use of chemical and mechanical foam, fix fog installations, and how to use a hand billy pump. You'll be shown how to put out a gasoline blaze with CO2, and extinguish oil fires in an open tank. You learn the proper way to fight fires in the hangar sections below decks and how to fight hangar fires from topside. The valuable techniques learned at the Fire Fighter's School reduce to a minimum fear of the element itself. You'll learn that adequate safety precautions and readiness to combat fire minimize the probability of outbreak.
10
PHYSICAL TRAINING
Physical conditioning is a very important part of recruit training. You begin with calisthenics, and as you develop strength and endurance, you progress to the obstacle courses. You are given instructions in boxing, wrestling, and other sports. You compete in rope climbing, relay racing, volleyball, and tug-o-war. But most important to you as a sailor is swimming and sea survival. In this part of your training you learn several major swimming styles, as well as the use of life jackets. You hear lectures on swimming submerged, swimming in oily waters, life saving and artificial respiration . . . all a part of the training devised to enable you to take care of yourself. A separate phase of the Physical Training Program deals with health and hygiene. And, of course, there are facilities for sports such as basketball and softball. By the end of your training you will find that you have gained weight—and all muscle.
11
TIME
Life at Boot Camp is not all drilling and marching 'on the double.' After your first few 'shakedown' weeks, there is time for liberty over the weekends . . . time for doing the town or having visitors. You get good Navy chow, and there are `gedunk' stands (soda fountains, to you) where you can get soft drinks, sandwiches, and candy. There are libraries and lounges where you can relax quietly. Religious services are available to persons of every faith.
12
OFF
Mail is delivered every day. You get the finest medical and dental care. You'll share the great spirit of teamwork that exists, as you and your shipmates try to make your company stand out as the greatest. You can manage a grin even when you help with the garbage detail or wash windows. And, of course, the Big Day is PAY DAY. There is nothing dull about Boot Camp. It is an exciting challenge to be met with a sense of adventure.
OBISS
ibirow
13
GRADUATION
The day every recruit looks forward to . . . the day when your company parades smartly in review to the martial music of a military band.
The first step in your Navy training is now behind you. You'll probably never forget the marching, the hurried atmosphere, the fact that everything was done 'on the double.' But you'll never forget how much you learned either. You learned to live with men of widely varied backgrounds. You found out that discipline is primarily a matter of self-control and character development. You experienced the benefits of the finest physical training. You absorbed the fundamentals of seamanship, gunnery, and fire fighting. You learned what it means to be a Navyman. And now, at long last, you're on your way to enjoy your first leave and a visit with friends and family before reporting to your first duty station. You're ready for specialized training. You're on your way. 14
I LOOK FORWARD
You can look forward to at least 4 years in which to discover career fields open to you. With over 60 ratings, there is a job field for every type person . . . whether you like to work with machinery or men . . . like outdoor life or office work. You will have opportunities to qualify for special schooling, and after 4 years you should be well on your way to the top. There is also the possibility of qualifying for officer training as you gain experience and know-how . . . at the Naval Academy . . . the NROTC colleges . . . as Naval Aviators . . . or through several in-service Navy programs. You can look forward to seeing parts of the world that ordinarily you would only read about in books.
In short, you can look forward to a great life . . . the Navy way of life.
15

Basic Indoctrination Received At Boot Camp - Exercise

Basic Indoctrination Received At Boot Camp - Exercise

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