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Camp Dix Pictorial - Water Supply System - November, 1917

Camp Dix Water Supply System

The picture (07-01 below) is that of the Camp Dix water supply station taken a few days before the building was finished. One turbine and pump unit had already been installed and was then in operation. A supply of water, estimated at 15,000,000 gallons daily, flows through the north branch of the Rancocas Creek, on which it is situated. Experiments in artesian well-driving indicate that subterranean water can possibly be obtained in a sufficient quantity and the surface water used only for an emergency. The water obtained from the creek is filtered through miles of sandy soil, characteristic of the pine section of New Jersey in which it originates. There is also a considerable percentage of cedar growing in the water-shed, and the water, coming in contact with fallen needles and cedar roots, is given a slight amber tinge and an almost imperceptible taste of cedar.

Camp Dix pumping Station at New Lisbon, New Jersey

Photograph 07-01: Camp Dix pumping Station at New Lisbon, New Jersey. From here it is pumped three miles through a 16-inch main

Putting down a section of big pipe

Photograph 07-02: Putting down a section of big pipe

Water Entering Camp Dix

Photograph 07-03: Water Entering Camp Dix - One thousand tons of 16-inch iron pipe were hauled for this water main.

The Temporary Water Pump and Engine

Photograph 07-04: The Temporary Water Pump and Engine

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Camp Dix : United States Army World War I Cantonment

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