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Vintage Brochure - Nautical Terms - 1923 - Pocket Handbook for Travelers

Abaft:
Toward the stern; further aft than.
Aft:
At, toward, or near the stern.
Alleyway:
Passageway.
Altitude:
Angular elevation of the Pole above the horizon.
Ballast:
Any weight or weights used to keep the ship . from becoming top-heavy.
Beam:
Greatest width of a vessel.
Bilge:
The flat, or nearly flat, part of a ship's bottom.
Bilge Keels:
Fin-like strips running lengthwise and projecting from the outer bilge on some ships to prevent rolling.
Bilge-water:
Foul water that collects in the bilge of a ship.
Bitts:
Heavy steel castings fitted to a deck for securing mooring lines or hawsers.
BOOM:
A long, round, heavy spar, pivoted at one end, generally used for hoisting cargo, etc. On sailing vessels the spar holding the bottom of a fore-and-aft sal.
Bow:
The forward part of a vessel.
Bridge:
The observation platform or partial deck built across and above a ship's deck for the use of officers in directing the course.
Bulkhcad:
A vertical partition running from side to side, of fore-and-aft beneath the deck. A collision bulkhead is the first partition forward, near the bow.
Bunker:
A compartment used for storage of fuel.
Cable:
The chain to which the anchor is fastened. The term "cable's length," means about 100 fathoms or 600 feet, one-tenth of a sea mile.
Capstan:
A windlass for winding the cable.
Chart:
A sea map used in navigation, showing depth of the sea, location of rocks, configuration of coast, etc.
Chart Room:
The Captain's office.
Coaming:
The vertical boundary of a hatch or skylight.
Companionway:
A staircase at the entrance of a ship's cabin.
Crow's Nest:
A barrel or box on the ship's foremast where the lookout is stationed.
Davits:
Heavy vertical pillars, of which the upper ends curve, used to support the ends of a boat when hoising or lowering.
Headlight:
Covering for portholes made of metal or wood and used in severe weather.
Dead Reckoning:
Method of ascertaining the approximate position of a vessel from the course steered and the distance run; used in times of heavy and protracted fog.
Dog:
A small, bent metal fitting, used to close doors, hatch covers, etc.
Draft or draught:
The depth to which a vessel sinks in the water; one commonly speaks of a ship's "drawing2 so many feet of water, which is the equivalent of her draft.
Drift Current:
Movement of the surface of the sea.
Ebb Tide:
The falling tide.
Equinox:
Equal length of day and night, the vernal equinox occurring toward the end of March and the autumnal toward the end, of September.
Fathom:
Six feet.
Flood Tide:
Rising tide.
Fo'c's'le: "Forecastle";
seamen's quarters in the bow.
Fore-and-aft:
Lengthwise with the ship.
Forward:
Toward the bow.
Galley:
The ship's kitchen.
Glory Hole:
Steward's quarters. Usually aft, over the propellers.
Hatch:
An opening in a deck.
Hawse Pipes:
Openings in the how for the anchor chain.
Hawser:
A large rope, commonly used for making fast to a pier or tender.
Hold:
The part of a ship below decks reserved for the storage of freight or baggage.
House Flag:
The pennant usually flown by a ship, bearing the emblem of her owners.
Hurricane Deck:
A deck with no overhead protection.
Keel:
The central longitudinal beam at the extreme under-side of the vessel; the foundation of the entire construction.
Knot:
A nautical mile. The British Admiralty knot is 6,080 feet; the statute knot is 6,082.66 feet, or 1.151 land miles.
Larboard:
The left side of a ship. Now obsolete and superseded by the word "port."
Lcad:
A mass of lead used for sounding at sea.
Lee or Leeward:
The side of the vessel away from the wind.
Log:
(a) An instrument towed by the vessel at the end of a long line, recording distance traveled. (b) Official daily record of a voyage, including weather, wind, direction and velocity, distance traveled, etc.
Mid-ship:
Toward the middle or "waist" of a vessel, is equally distant from bow and stern. The term "amidships" is frequently used.
Mooring:
Securing a ship in position by lines so she cannot move or swing; anchoring.
Overhang:
Portion of hull, over and unsupported by the water.
Pilot:
Usually the licensed "guide" who comes aboard ship from a near port and directs her course through the local channel to anchorage or pier, or from the pier to the outer end of the channel.
Pilot House:
Sheltered position connected with the bridge from which the ship is steered.
Pitching:
See-saw motion caused by the plunging of the vesselis head into the sea and the consequent raising of the stern. Distinguished from rolling, which is a movement from side to side.
Poop:
Raised deck toward the stern of the vessel. Port: The left side of a vessel. French, babord.
Porthole:
Stateroom window.
Rudder:
The hinged projection astern for steering, controlled by chains from under the bridge.
Sailing Vessels, varieties:
(a) A full-rigged ship has usually three masts, on all of which are square sails. (b) A bark has three masts, all square-rigged except the third or mizzenmast, which is fore-and-aft rigged. (c) A barkantine has three masts, the foremost square-rigged, the other two fore-and-aft rigged. (d) A brig has two masts, both square-rigged. (e) A brigantine has two masts, square-rigged except for a fore-and-aft mainsail. (f) A schooner has two or more masts, with fore-and-aft sails. (g) A sloop has a single mast, fore-and-aft rigged. Scending: Heaving upward; a mixing of rolling and pitching.
Serew:
The ship's propeller.
Scuppers;
Drains from the edge of a deck, discharging overboard.
Sextant:
An instrument for measuring angular distance, used in ascertaining the ship's position by taking the sun's altitude at noon.
shaft:
Long, round, heavy forging, connecting engine and propeller.
Soundings:
Means of measuring the depth of the water by dropping a lead line from beneath the bridge.
Spar:
A round timber for extending a sail; a mast, a yard or a boom.
Spring Tide:
High tide caused by the sun and moon being on Meridian together, or in opposition.
Starboard;
The right side of a ship. French, tribord.
Stem:
A nearly upright timber or metal piece constituting the forward member of a vessel's hull; the bow.
Stern:
The rear end of a vessel.
Taffrail:
A rail around a vessel's stern; the upper part of a vessel's stern.
Tender:
As applied to ocean travel, a small steamer for meeting ships in ports and taking off or putting on passengers.
Thwartship:
Crosswise to the ship.
Weatherside, Windward:
Side of vessel toward the wind. Winch: A small hoisting engine.
Yards:
Spars set crosswise of a mast and used to support square-sails.

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