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Cabin Class Staterooms - 1893 Cunard Passenger's Log Book


The distinctive feature of the great majority of the state rooms is their great height, which approximates to to feet. This, of itself, insures satisfactory ventilation, while jalousies are adopted wherever practicable, and, in addition, Utley's system of ventilation is adopted, as we shall describe later on, so that even in the case of those rooms which are not close to the shell of the ship, the air will be changed frequently.

The beds throughout the ship are entirely of iron. The old type of wooden berth, which was more in keeping with the vessels of 20 or 30 years ago, has been entirely superseded, not only for passengers, but for officers, crew, and firemen. The beds in the state rooms are of Hoskin's " triptic" type, which combine lightness with strength. The upper bed, with all its bedding folds up against the bulkhead, so that in the event of a smaller number of passengers being on board, than is contemplated, in the ordinary course of events, there will always be much more room for those who are travelling.

Parlour and Bedroom

Parlour and Bedroom

The lee board, while framed in iron, has carved mahogany panels, and a new feature has been adopted in this respect which will add greatly to the comfort of the passengers. In the old type of wooden berth the lee hoard extended the whole length of the berth and formed the front of a sort of box, in the act of getting into and out of which—especially if one occupied the upper berth—the passenger had to perform something approaching an acrobatic feat. The result was not always comfortable, nor the spectacle elegant.

In the modern arrangements the lee board extends only one half the length of the bed, and it can be easily fixed at either end or in the centre, so that while the ship is in a sea the passenger has all the advantage of the arrangement, and has freedom of movement either out of or into the berth. Experience has shown that this length of lee board is sufficient for protection.

The profusion of small shelves, trinket drawers, book racks, &c., in the state rooms certainly suggest that the designer had an intimate knowledge of the essential requirements of passengers especially of ladies, whose love of cupboards, etc.. is almost proverbial. There is a large wardrobe in each room, and, of course, the usual wash. stand, life-belt, racks, hooks, etc. The general rooms are fitted in mahogany, and upholstered ith plush or velvet, while the fittings are electro-plated. Electric light and electric call bells add to the very complete sum of comfortable surroundings.

There are rooms to suit all tastes in the ship. A large number of single berth cabins are, as we have said, provided, and many double cabins, together with several three or four berth rooms, while family apartments are provided in addition to magnificently appointed suites on the upper deck. Several of these ensuit rooms are fitted in the most beautiful satinwood and mahogany. They are arranged as parlour and bedroom, the parlour being fitted with table, couch, and chair, on the model of a lady's boudoir, with suitable decorations.

In the bedroom is a handsome brass-furnished bedstead with over-hangings. There are toilet arrangements in the most excellent style, with all the etceteras desirable. While these suites of rooms will form the highest attraction, there are, on the same deck, a large number of superior rooms, although not associated with the same luxuries. They are fitted on the lines of the better class of state rooms, but panelled in hardwood instead of being painted, and supplied with patent collapsible bedsteads. The bedstead is capable of being extended to form a double bed, and when a single bed the front rail may be collapsed to form a couch or settee.

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