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Music and Concerts for Passengers on board the Ocean Liners and Steamships

MUSIC

On many lines small string orchestras are carried on the steamers, and their services are paid for by the company, but occasionally a plate is passed around by some of the passengers on the day before landing, and on some of the German lines there is a band and passengers are expected to contribute for their benefit. The offering is made when the steward collects for the passengers' wine bills ; the word musik being printed across the bottom of the bill. Nearly every steamer carries a piano which can be used by passengers.

The Ships' Band Plays on Deck

The Ships' Band Plays on Deck

often surprising, is obtained from the passengers. Only those who can really do something worth while should accept an invitation to take part, as the audience is apt to be critical. A contribution is often taken for the benefit of some seamen's charities. Programs (six pence or a shilling) are sold for the same purpose. National anthems form a part of the program, and it is regrettable that so few Americans have not more than a passing acquaintance with "America," or "The Star Spangled Banner," while an Englishman is sure to know "God Save the King," and "Rule Britannia."

To assist the memory, words and music of the National Anthems follow ; versions vary greatly, particularly in the "Marseillaise," so the French words are given as well. The increasing shortness of voyages seems to be the cause of the decadence of the ship's concert. On German boats the captain's dinner takes its place.

On one or two vessels a winter garden is provided, tastefully decorated with palms. tropical plants, and flowers, affording a most delightful resort for passengers who can listen to the orchestra.

CONCERTS

A concert is often held at sea, although they are not as frequent as in former years. The talent, which is often surprising, is obtained from the passengers. Only those who can really do something worth while should accept an invitation to take part, as the audience is apt to be critical. A contribution is often taken for the benefit of some seamen's charities.

Programs (six pence or a shilling) are sold for the same purpose. National anthems form a part of the program, and it is regrettable that so few Americans have not more than a passing acquaintance with "America," or "The Star Spangled Banner," while an Englishman is sure to know "God Save the King." and "Rule Britannia."

To assist the memory, words and music of the National Anthems follow; versions vary greatly, particularly in the "Marseillaise," so the French words are given as well. The increasing shortness of voyages seems to be the cause of the decadence of the ship's concert. On German boats the captain's dinner takes its place.

On one or two vessels a winter garden is provided, tastefully decorated with palms, tropical plants, and flowers, affording a most delightful resort for passengers who can listen to the orchestra.

[Sheet music including lyrics for the songs listed above follows this text in the brochure and are reproduced below with images.]

Music Score - America

Music Score - America

Music Score - Star Spangled Banner

Music Score - Star Spangled Banner

Music Score - Star Spangled Banner

Music Score - Star Spangled Banner

Music Score - God Save the King

Music Score - God Save the King

Music Score - Britania

Music Score - Britania

Music Score - The Marseillaise

Music Score - The Marseillaise

Music Score - The Marseillaise

Music Score - The Marseillaise

Music Score - Watch on the Rhine

Music Score - Watch on the Rhine

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1910 Travel Guide by Scientifc American

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Express Package Rates

Fees At Private Houses In England

Fees Paid by Passengers on Steamships and Ocean Liners

Foreign Customs - A Note To Passengers Of Steamships

Funds Needed On Board For Voyage

Getting the "Sea Legs" - Learning to Walk on a Steamship

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Memoranda For The Year 1910

Memoranda For The Year 1911

Miscellaneous Gleanings and Facts - 1910 Travel Guide

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Money By Telegraph

Music and Concerts for Passengers

Nurse

Ocean Stop-Over at Ports of Call Around the World

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Seasickness on Journeys on Steamships and Ocean Liners

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Terminal Ports and Ports of Call of Principal Transatlantic Steamships / Ocean Liners

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What To Pack For Your Voyage

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