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Vintage Fashions - Women's Fashionable Mourning Outfits - 1900

Fashionable Mourning Outfits - View 1

FIGURES Nos. 158 T, 159 T, 160 T (Above), 161 T, 162 T AND 163 T. (Below) —FOR FASHIONABLE MOURNING.

FIGURE No. 158 T.—This combines a Ladies' jacket and skirt. The jacket pattern, which is No. 4402 and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is in nine sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-six inches, bust measure, and is differently portrayed on page 443.

The skirt pattern, which is No. 4429 and costs 1s. or 25 cents, is in nine sizes from twenty to thirty-six inches, waist measure, and is again illustrated on page 460.

This toilette is of graceful shaping and is admirable for serviceable outdoor wear. Fine black cheviot was used in the development with Persian lamb for facing the collar and fronts of the jacket, which is fully described at Figure No. 139 T. Rows of machine-stitching supply a neat finish to the toilette.

The skirt is in five-gored style with a short sweep and is shaped to flare gracefully at the bottom. It is distinguished by narrow side-gores and a band flounce that flares very slightly and is of circular shaping. An inverted box-plait disposes of the fulness at the back, and the mode shows the fashionable dip at the top.

Broadcloth with facings of broadtail would develop a fashionable toilette.

FIGURE No. 159 T.—This embraces a Ladies' jacket and skirt. The jacket pattern, which is No. 4458 and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is in nine sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-six inches, bust measure, and is differently shown on page 443. The skirt pattern, which is No. 4448 and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is in nine sizes from twenty to thirty-six inches, waist measure, and is again pictured on page 462.

Self-strappings give a neat and tailor-like finish to this toilette, which is here pictured made of black cheviot. The coat or jacket is gracefully adjusted and is fully described at figure No. 140 T.

The skirt is of comfortable walking length and, in this instance, is made with a seam at the centre of the front and back. It may be in one piece and is equally appropriate for cycling, golfing, etc., and is fully described at figure No. 144 T, where it is developed for evening wear for a young girl.

Double-faced cloth would develop the skirt stylishly, and melton or any of the fashionable coatings may be used for the coat with fur for decoration or a plain finish of stitching.

FIGURE No. 160 T.—This unites a Ladies' blouse Eton and skirt. The Eton pattern, which is No. 4352, and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is in seven sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-two inches, bust measure. The skirt pattern, which is No. 4449, and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is in nine sizes from twenty to thirty-six inches, waist measure, and may be seen again on page 461 of this number of THE DELINEATOR.

Heavy black serge was the material employed in reproducing this toilette in combination with grosgrain silk which was tucked for the vest front and standing collar. Strappings of the serge and silk and machine-stitching provide pretty decoration. The blouse Eton is smooth at the back, but has fulness at the bottom of the fronts which pouch prettily. The fronts are broadly reversed to form the front of the deep sailor-collar, and the sleeves are in plain two-seam style.

The skirt is a five-gored mode and is in instep length ; it is fully described at Figure No. 140 T.

The toilette would be attractive developed in Henrietta or wool poplin, with taffeta for the vest front, collar and strappings.

Fashionable Mourning Outfits - View 2

Figures 161 T, 162 T and 163 T: For Fashionable Mourning

FIGURE No. 161 T.—This consists of a Ladies' basquewaist and skirt. The waist pattern, which is No. 4209 and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is in seven sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-two inches, bust measure. The skirt pattern, which is No. 4388 and costs is. or 25 cents, is in seven sizes from twenty to thirty-two inches, waist measure, and is again illustrated on page 459.

Notwithstanding its long popularity, the bolero is still receiving flattering attention and promises to appear in many attractive styles during the present season. The fanciful shaping of the one forming part of the waist embraced in this toilette is novel and becoming. It is shaped to disclose effectively the smooth back and full fronts of the waist and 'is extended in strap fashion in front. A standing collar finishes the neck, and the two-seam sleeves are of close adjustment and fancifully shaped at the wrist.

The skirt is an unusually attractive mode and is fully described at Figure No. 146 T. In the present instance the development is made effective by the combination of dull-black Henrietta and crepe lisse, with rosettes and folds of crape for decoration.

Plisse crépon would develop a handsome deep mourning gown in combination with tucked chiffon. Henrietta, nun's-veiling, crape cloth and any dull-finished woolen may be combined with taffeta or crape in developing the toilette.

FIGURE No. 162 T.—This unites a Ladies' waist and skirt. The waist pattern, which is No. 4433 and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is in eight sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-four inches, bust measure, and is again pictured on page 445. The skirt pattern, which is No. 4451 and costs 1s. or 25 cents, is in seven sizes, from twenty to thirty-two inches, waist measure, and is also portrayed on page 455 of this magazine.

This toilette will prove acceptable for dinner and dressy at home wear and is developed in black crepe de Chine associated with black net and chiffon ruchings. The waist is in low, rounding outline at the back, but shaped to form a V in front. It has slight plaited fulness in the lower part of the back, and the fronts blouse gracefully at the bottom. A fanciful sectional bertha, and a soft drapery section arranged about the neck and extended down the fronts contribute to the attractiveness of the mode, which has elbow sleeves that are short enough to reveal a drooping puff of the net.

A five-gored tunic is a conspicuous feature of the skirt, which has the same number of gores. The tunic is in fancy outline at the bottom and is short enough to reveal a flounce arranged about the foot of the skirt. Both the skirt and tunic are dart-fitted over the hips, and an inverted box-plait at the centre of the back disposes of the fulness in the latter. The artistic arrangement of the chiffon ruchings contributes much to the charming results.

Vailing, India silk, cashmere, albatross, crape cloth, etc., will develop attractive toilettes combined with contrasting materiah Louisine, a dull-finished, silky fabric, could be stylishly associated with crape in the production of the mode.

FIGURE No. 163T.— This embraces a Ladies' skirt and Russian blouse. The blouse pattern, which is No. 4146 and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is in seven sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-two inches, bust measure, and is differently illustrated on page 450. The skirt pattern, which is No. 4406 and costs is. or 25 cents, is in nine sizes from twenty to thirty-six inches, waist measure, and is pictured differently made up on page 456 of this number.

A simple disposal of folds of crape materially enhances the attractiveness of this graceful toilette. The blouse is one of the fashionable Russian modes and is developed in dull-finished black taffeta. Tucks prettily dispose of the fulness to yoke depth in the wide right-front, which, with the left front, is gathered at the waist-line and puffs out fashionably. The back only has slight fulness at the bottom drawn down close toward the centre. A standing collar and straight cuff with pointed, overlapping ends complete the neck and bishop sleeve respectively.

The skirt is of novel shaping and is fully described at Figure No. 143 T. In this instance black Henrietta was used in the development.

Cashmere, dull-finished woolens, crape cloth, albatross and nun's-vailing are standard materials for developing mourning gowns. A stylish skirt could be made in this style of Imperial serge with machine-stitching for the finish, and the blouse could be of soft India silk.

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