Browse The Gjenvick-Gjønvik Archives Home Page

Vintage Fashions - Women's Négligé Garments - 1900

Négligé Garments

FIGURES Nos. 154 T AND 155 T.—NEGLIGE GARMENTS.

FIGU RE No. 154 T.—LADIES' NEGLIGE. — LADIES' BASQUE-WAIST OR BODICE, TO BE MADE WITH HIGH OR LOW NECK AND WITH FULL-LENGTH OR ELBOW SLEEVES.

This illustrates a Ladies' dressing-sack or matinée. The pattern, which is No. 4443 and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is in five sizes for ladies from thirty-two to forty inches, bust measure, and is again portrayed on page 451.

The lavish use of lace edging and insertion gives an elaborate appearance to the simple design here illustrated made of pale-yellow silk. The garment shows smooth adjustment at the sides and back, where it terminates at the waist-line, and possesses a novelty in the Directoire fronts that are turned back to form triangular revers, below which they hang loosely and taper to points considerably below the Waist.

The neck is collarless and finished with the lace frill that is continued around all the free edges of the garment. The loose two-seam sleeves terminate in points just below the elbow and are exceptionally becoming and comfortable. The fronts may be knotted at the waist-line if desired.

A dainty sack could be made in this style of peach-colored surah silk with plaited chiffon frills for decoration. Fine lawn could also be employed, with all-over embroidery or lace for facing the revers and edging for decoration.

FIGURE No. 155 T.—LADIES' BASQUE-WAIST OR BODICE. LADIES' Tea-JACKET AND PETTICOAT- SKIRT.—

This unites a Ladies' tea-jacket and petticoat-skirt. The tea-jacket pattern, which is No. 4392 and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is in eight sizes for ladies from thirty to forty-four inches, bust measure, and is again pictured on page 450. The petticoat-skirt pattern, which is No. 3906 and costs 10d. or 20 cents, is in nine sizes from twenty to thirty-six inches, waist measure.

An attractive matinee, known as the Louis XV tea-jacket, and a petticoat-skirt of graceful shaping are pictured at this figure. The tea-jacket is here developed in 4441 a combination of figured crepe de Chine and plain silk with ribbon and bands of appliqué for garniture.

The garment is closely adjusted at the sides and back and has dart-fitted fronts that flare all the way over a full vest that reaches to the waist. The fronts are turned back in scolloped, tapering revers that are extended to the centre of the back to form a flat collar, and the jacket is scolloped at the lower edge. Turn-over portions top the standing collar which finishes the neck, and the close-fitting sleeves are completed with scolloped cuffs.

The five-gored petticoat-skirt is without any fulness at the top and is admirable for wear with skirts that are closely adjusted about the hips. . A distinguishing feature of the mode is the flounce, which consists of a straight, full ruffle gathered at the top and finished at the lower edge with a rippling, circular ruffle. The petticoat-skirt is shown made of light-blue silk with black lace insertion for the decoration.

Fine flannel, Liberty or India silk, Lansdowne, cashmere, etc., will develop dainty tea-jackets by the mode, and the petticoat-skirt may be of moreen, mohair, cambric or mercerized satin, with braid, pipings, folds, plaitings, ruchings, narrow frills and lace insertion and edging for decoration.

Return to Top of Page

Historical Fashions Archives

Search The Archives

Google Custom Search