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Vintage Fashions and Historical Clothing Styles Archives 1880s - 1930s

Men's and Women's Clothing Styles on Board the Steamships

Womens Fashions Of Today - Circa June 1903

The Gjenvick-Gjønvik Archives contains a large number of photographs, articles and period advertisements for fashion and related topics. The student of fashion may gain a greater understanding of the styles provided for both the affluent and the common under-classes.

Vintage Fashion Articles

Mrs. Eliza Aria wrote annual articles for the Cunard Steamship Line which appeared in The Cunard Daily Bulletin, Fashion & Pleasure Resort Supplement printed once a year.

  • November Fashions for Women
    by Mrs. Johnstone (1887-11)
    All kinds of materials will be worn this autumn and winter, rich brocaded silks, plain silks and velvets, striped silks, heavy matelassés in wonderful consolidation of color.
  • Exquisite Women's Winter Fashions from Paris (1887-11)
    To receive this bouton from a princely house is a compliment If the Amazon dress does ant give much scope for the whims of fashion.
  • Summer Fashions in London
    by Mrs. Johnstone (1888-08)
    The beautiful dress from Messrs. Jay, Regent Street, in our first illustration, demonstrates two or three notable points to he borne in mind in ordering new gowns.
  • Dress Fashions and Gossip in Paris
    by Mrs. John Van Vorst (1900)
    On Women’s Fashions in Pairs, to anyone who has had time and an opportunity for studying the retrospective exhibition of costumes at the Exposition during the past summer, the coming change will not be a great surprise.
  • The Fashions of London
    by Mrs. Eliza Aria (1900)
    British Women’s Fashions from London are discussed at length from the very popular columnist and reporter, Mrs. Aria. She was a renowned critic of fashion for eveningwear and for day-to day work.
  • Fashion of Today: The Du Barry Coat
    The du Barry coat is extremely modish and to tall, slight figures it is especially becoming. A dressy example made of taffeta, is stitched in tuck fashion at the inner or outer folds of the plaits. (1902-09)
  • Fashions of London: Autumn Dresses
    Dress for the evening at the hotels abroad is a question very worthy of consideration at the moment, and white lace and black lace may be taken to represent the ideal materials. (1902-09)
  • September Dress And Gossip of Paris
    by Mrs. John Van Vorst (1902-09)
    No woman can look well-dressed unless she be properly corseted, and quite as important as the corset itself, its shape and fit, is the way in which it is put on.
  • June Women's Fashions of Today
    One of the most popular modes in shirt-waists, that will lend itself admirably to development in any of the mercerized or vesting fabrics, has two broad tucks in front and closes at the centre of the back in lap or duchess style. (1903-06)
  • The June Fashions of London
    One of the most popular modes in shirt-waists, that will lend itself admirably to development in any of the mercerized or vesting fabrics, has two broad tucks in front and closes at the centre of the back in lap or duchess style. (1903-06)
  • Women's Fashions of Today - Summer Styles
    In the Summer styles long, flowing lines, sloping shoulder effects, quaint collars and berthas are extremely picturesque, and never before have materials lent themselves with such grace to the fashionable modes. (1903-07)
  • The Fashions of London: The Indispensable Blouse
    by Mrs. Aria (1903-07)
    Let me be practical and dilate for a while upon blouses, for they are the most indispensable of all our possessions. Their popularity waxes rather than wanes.
  • July Dress and Gossip of Paris
    by Mrs. John Van Vorst (1903-07)
    Of the various changes proposed in the very early season there are always a few which remain as definite modifications and which mark the new tendencies known as fashionable.
  • Women's Holiday Fashions
    by A. J. Ashmore (1904-01)
    One point, however, may be noted—the exception that proves the rule—that there is certainly a revulsion of feeling against the too gorgeous and elaborate clothes that a year ago were thought so extremely smart.
  • Street Gowns and Wraps for Women
    At this time of the winter the street costume is most important, and the styles are so thoroughly settled that it is quite safe for the most conservative to choose a costume. (1904-01)
  • Shopping for Women's Fine Fashions in London
    by Mrs. Eliza Aria (1906)
    There is subtle and convincing charm about the clothes at Jay's, of Regent Street. To this sartorial creed I will undertake to convert any woman, provided that she follow the course I lay down for her fashionable guidance, and earnestly investigate certain new gowns shown me this morning.
  • The World of Dress - Latest Women's Fashions for 1906
    by Mrs. Eliza Aria
    Mrs. Aria reviews the latest fashions for women that were worn in the early 1900s on board the First and possibly second class sections of the transatlantic steamships.
  • London's Fashion Shops and Boutiques
    by Mrs. Eliza Aria - (1907)
    Each well-known establishment has its speciality, its pronounced characteristics, and its exclusive clientele, so that the alert society woman familiar with her modern Babylon can guess which famous decorator is responsible for the success of a certain drawing-room or boudoir, and for which celebrated Maison de modes a hat or gown emanates.
  • Women wearing fine lace blouse - Irish Industries

  • The Remarkable Irish Linen Industry
    The products of the Irish peasants have long been famed for their quality and excellent workmanship, but notwithstanding the knowledge, taste and economy displayed by these industrious cottagers. (1907)
  • The London World of Dress in 1907
    by Mrs. Eliza Aria
    Latest Women's Fashions for 1907: We meet in mid-ocean once again and sympathetically clasp hands, at least one hand, and that the left one, for my right is holding the pen which brings you the tidings of Fashion as she appears in London in the zenith of her early Spring-time. On the whole it must be conceded that her conduct is excellent.
  • In the Path of London's Fashions Shops
    by Mrs. Eliza Aria (1908)
    A novelty is the fan-shaped mirror, cleverly contrived with a strut as the back so that it may either stand or sit at your convenience. New, too, is the powder-box with the double lid, the upper one being just sufficient to hold the puff and a little powder
  • The World of Dress in London of 1908
    by Mrs. Eliza Aria - Latest Women's Fashions for 1908
    We are waiting anxiously for the arrival of the Americans," have been the cheering words of the London purveyors of the frock luxurious during the recent " slump."
  • The Vanguard of Fashion (1912)
    AZELINE LEWIS writes about a FRENCH lady, in the course of a lecture recently, said that there was a closer connection between the dress and customs of a nation than one generally supposed, and in proof of her statement, instanced the present fashions and craze for “ line,” as a sign of the independence of the modern woman.
  • Fine Women's Fashions for Ocean Liner Travel
    Clothes may not make the man, but they do go a long way toward creating a favorable impression for a woman. First impressions count heavily in this busy, hypocritical, mundane world where ships pass so often in the night. (1921-07)
  • Women's Fashion on Board the Steamships - Wraps to Welcome the Atlantic Breezes
    Even if madam be luxuriously inclined, caring to rest and while away the interim on shipboard with what amusements her stateroom, the lounges and card rooms offer, she must still have her moments of exercise on deck. (1921-12)
  • Women's Fashions For The Crisp Brisk Days at Sea
    For evening wear Russian ermine, white caracul, chinchilla and black Persian broadtail are the luxurious furs from which one may choose. Black fox or sable upon the collar and sleeve bandings make a striking contrast. (1922-11)
  • In the Path of the Purchaser (1912)
    THERE are few now-a-days who do not wear woolen undergarments, and consequently few who do not know —and doubtless bless—the name of Dr. Jaeger, and associate everything connected with the world-famous apostle of hygienic wear with perfection of workmanship and the purest of materials. These and other fine stores are described in detail. Great context for clothing styles of this era.
  • 1900 Women's Fashions of Today - Large selection of women's fashions at the turn-of-the century. Over 30 pages of vintage clothing and accessories including: Evening wear, Women's Suits, Toilettes, Costumes, Negligee Garments, Bride and Bridesmaid Dresses, and Hats.
  • Paris Couturiers Have Introduced New Wrap Silhouette (1919)
    JACOB RAPOPORT REPORTS PARIS COUTURIERS HAVE INTRODUCED NEW WRAP SILHOUETTE
    Mr. Rapoport Returned from Paris Recently Bringing with Him a Most Interesting Aggregation of French Model . Wraps, All Offering Different Versions of the New Silhouette
  • Fine Women's Fashion for Ocean Liner Travel (1921)
    By CAROLYN TROWBRIDGE RADNOR-LEWIS
    Clothes may not make the man, but they do go a long way toward creating a favorable impression for a woman. First impressions count heavily in this busy, hypocritical, mundane world where ships pass so often in the night.
  • Women's Fashion Wraps to Welcome the Atlantic Breezes on Board the Steamships (1921)
    By JULIA MARQUIS
    At this season of the year a woman preparing to travel abroad must consider with a capital C her comfort. To be adequately outfitted for the trip the warmest of outer wraps are essential. Even if madam be luxuriously inclined, caring to rest and while away the interim on shipboard with what amusements her stateroom, the lounges and card rooms offer, she must still have her moments of exercise on deck. The athletic and outdoor loving woman will find her chief recreation as well as necessity in periods spent on deck, and will revel in them, whether she be battling the buffeting winds or basking in the sunshine when Nature smiles her best.
  • Women's First Class Fashions For Days at Sea (1922)
    By ETHEL FLEMING
    For the days when the winds race along the water and sky and sea make a lovely symphony of grays and stern blues, the designers have planned wraps that have not only charm, but a cozy and delicious amount of warmth and protection. So that one may feel as comfortable as Baby Bunting in his rabbit-skin, and yet look as delightful as if it were summer, when crisp organdies and frilly furbelows make nearly every woman as good to look at as a magazine-cover maiden !
  • On The Crest of the Wave of Fashion (March 1924)
    What the fashionable First-Class and Cabin-Class Women were wearing during their voyages across the Atlantic as reported in the Cunarder Magazine.
  • On The Crest of the Wave of Fashion (February 1925)
    Fashionable First-Class and Cabin-Class Women were wearing delightful and elegant outfits in early 1925 during their voyages across the Atlantic and tripds to the continent of Europe as reported in the Cunarder Magazine.

Bunads (Folk Costumes)

  • A Trip To Dalecarlia - Folk Costumes From Sweden
    It was a pleasant July evening as we steamed away from Stockholm through the wide thoroughfare by Furusund, and I lingered long on deck in the glowing Northern twilight enjoying the beautiful views of luminous water reaches. dotted with dark spruce-crowned isles.
  • Liebig's Extract Norwegian Folk Costumes Advertising Trading Cards
    Early 1900's German Advertising Trading Card set featuring Old Norwegian Costumes or Bunads from Liebig's Fleisch - Extrakt (Meat Extract). These litohgraphic art cards are very rare and popular with collectors.
  • The Peasant Costumes of Europe
    In the faces and costumes of the people are written the history of a nation, the record of its degeneration and its development-the men of the cities become uniform, cosmopolitan; the folk of the farms and the mountains remain types, standards of racial characteristics. (circa 1900)

Vintage Advertisements

The majority of these article and print advertisements were published in magazines available on board steamships and ocean liners on transatlantic voyages.

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